Fitting the Tutoro chain oiler

Since I’ve had a Tutoro chain oiler on my Kawasaki Versys 1000 from new and it’s been faultless for the last 12000 miles I decided to fit another one to my adventure bike for the trip.

Having a Tusk pannier frame and rack on the CRF250 Rally is actually a bonus as it creates the perfect mounting point for the oil reservoir which would be difficult to mount on a stock machine.

Oil reservoir mounted nicely behind the left hand pannier

The oil reservoir comes with a selection of mounting brackets that probably work on most bikes however, for this installation I had to modify one of the supplied mount to make it work. The oiler comes with a neat little 90 degree bend mount that I had to straighten in order for it to work with the Tusk frame.

As you can see in the photo above, there is a very short straight mount between the bottom of the reservoir and the back of the Tusk cross bar. I straightened it out with a hammer on an anvil gently so as to not crack and break it on the bend. This seemed to work well and has mounted perfectly.

Since I’m going to be riding a lot of washboard trails I also put a cable tie through the spare mount hole in the bottom of the reservoir and around the frame so if the mount bracket does break I won’t lose it.

Cable tie in place to save the reservoir in event of mount failure

Tutoro also very kindly sent me the metal protection cover for the glass reservoir so that it doesn’t get broken by flying stones when riding off-road.


The oiler kit comes with a long length of clear plastic tubing for the oil delivery. This is really easy to route on the CRF250 Rally as there are plenty of places to tie it to. Leaving the bottom of the reservoir it runs neatly behind the Givi GRT709 pannier mount and then along the metal tubing that makes up the Tusk frame.

From the Tusk frame the tube runs down the subframe tube and then along the side of the swinging arm towards the chain stone guard under the rear of the swinging arm.

Oil delivery nozzle mounted in lower chain guard

The CRF250 Rally has a neat little plastic stone guard as standard. To mount the oil delivery nozzle directly over the chain just before it arrives at the rear sprocket it was necessary to drill two little holes in the top of the plastic guard and pass a cable tie through to form a loop. I then passed the delivery nozzle and tube through this loop and tightened the cable tie as show above. This provides the perfect mounting place for the oil delivery nozzle ensuring the chain is lubricated centrally.

Cable tie mount for oil delivery nozzle

The photo above shows the top of the chain guard and the cut off cable tie that holds the oil delivery nozzle in place.

This works a treat and allows plenty of clearance for the chain to pass without contact.

Oil delivery nozzle

The oil delivery nozzle sits perfectly between the stone guard and the rear sprocket with plenty of clearance for all components in the drive chain.

Bleeding the il feed system

The Tutoro oiler relies solely on gravity to deliver the oil to the chain and thus it’s important not to have any up hill runs in the delivery tube. Once everything is secured in place it’s just a matter of filling the reservoir and opening the flow control valve to maximum whilst putting the master valve opener magnet on top of the reservoir.

This then allows the oil to run freely down the delivery tube to the nozzle. Since it’s still winter here the oil is rather thick and so this process took about 15mins. If you’re installing this in the summer you’ll find that the oil runs through much quicker.

Once the oil arrives at the nozzle it’s just a case of adjusting the valve to restrict the oil flow such that there is just a drop every 30secs or so. Once this is done remove the magnet and the installation is complete.

These oilers really are very simple to install and work extremely well.

Remember that in the summer months you will need to close the flow valve slightly as the oil will flow easier due to temperature and then in winter open it up again. I have found on my Kawasaki that there is normally a 1 to 1.5 turn difference on the valve between winter and summer.